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Welcome to Cyberport

Welcome to Cyberport

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Return of the smash

Return of the smash

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Wonder wheel

Wonder wheel

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New bus stop… #occupycentral (at IFC)

New bus stop… #occupycentral (at IFC)

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How Wolves Change Rivers – trophic cascades and keystone species (bookmark for #biomimicry and #systemsthinking)

(Source: youtube.com)

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The last gasp of #sirPuffsNoMo

The last gasp of #sirPuffsNoMo

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Video
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Human Foosball (at LI & FUNG (TRADING) LTD - 利豊(貿易)有限公司)

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Innovation vs. Shanzhai Culture, asks “Is speed or integrity the sustainable competitive advantage?”

From Technode on Pressy:

Chinese web developers were notorious for making pixel-to-pixel copies of western Internet products. Now with crowdfunding platforms, copycats can get funding and early users even before they can make a product. For ideas that were first exposed to the public like Pressy, one terrible thing could be the late comers who adopt their ideas ship products, good or not, even earlier than them. So far Pressy don’t think those counterfeits have had real products ready. Crowdfunding ecosystem doesn’t seem like a place that copycats can get away with. Backers are so important to the ecosystem. It’ll be interesting to see the reactions of backers whenever they find out the idea they back with money and love is actually stolen from elsewhere. Greedy venture capital may don’t care to invest in a mere copy, but backers of ideas on platforms like Kickstarter are not only for certain products or returns. The Chinese backer of Pressy said he’d ask for refund right away if the product turns out to be a counterfeit.

(Source: technode.com)

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#nativeadvertising (at LiFung Tower)

#nativeadvertising (at LiFung Tower)

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Attractive gentleman

Attractive gentleman

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Today I learned ketchup is Chinese.

From Wikipedia:

In the 17th century, the Chinese mixed a concoction of pickled fish and spices and called it (in the Amoy dialect) kôe-chiap or kê-chiap (鮭汁, Mandarin Chinese guī zhī, Cantonese gwai1 zap1) meaning the brine of pickled fish (鮭, salmon; 汁, juice) or shellfish.[5]

By the early 18th century, the table sauce had made it to the Malay states (present day Malaysia and Singapore), where it was discovered by English explorers. The Indonesian-Malay word for the sauce was kecap (pronounced “kay-chap”). That word evolved into the English word “ketchup”.[6] English settlers took ketchup with them to the American colonies.[1]

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Attractive gentleman

Attractive gentleman

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Barely contained madness.

Barely contained madness.